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Thai Massage

Thai massage is a type of massage in Thai style that involves stretching and deep massage.
This form of bodywork is usually performed on the floor, and the client wears
 comfortable clothes that allow for movement. No oils are used in Thai massage.  It is known in Thailand as "nuat phaen boran" (Thai: นวดแผนโบราณ, IPA: [nûət  pʰɛ̌ːn boːraːn]), literally, the ancient-manner massage.
The massage recipient changes into loose, comfortable clothes, and lies
 on a mat or firm mattress on the floor. It can be done solo or in a group of a dozen or so patients in the same large room. The receiver is put into many yoga-like positions during the course of the massage.
The massage practitioner leans on the recipient's body using hands and
 usually straight forearms locked at the elbow to apply firm rhythmic pressure. The massage generally follows the Sen lines on the body—somewhat analogous to meridians or Channel  (Chinese medicine) and Indian nadis. Legs and feet of the giver can be used to fixate the body or limbs of the recipient. In other positions, hands fixate the body, while the feet do the massaging action. A full Thai massage session typically lasts two hours or more, and includes rhythmic pressing and stretching of the entire body; this may include pulling fingers, toes, ears, cracking the knuckles, walking on the recipient's back, and arching the recipient's into bhujangasana or (cobra position). There is a standard procedure and rhythm to this massage.
Generally speaking, practitioners of modern Thai massage operate on the
 theory that the body is permeated with "lom," or "air," which is inhaled into the lungs and which subsequently travels throughout the body along 72,000 pathways called "sen," or "vessels." Typically, massage therapists manipulate a handful of major sen lines by pressing certain points along the lines. In most models, the sen originate at the navel and spread throughout the body to terminate at the orifices. A significant part of the practice of Thai massage also includes yoga-like stretches which are intended to stimulate the sen and move lom through the body via a pumping action which is connected with the patient's breathing.
The theory of sen and lom is often translated into English as "meridians" and
 "energy." While there are some superficial similarities to Chinese meridian theory, the Thai system is markedly different as the sen are unconnected from the internal organs.

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